Emily Marks of The Bachelor Farmer

Chelsea Korth / Heavy Table

The baker Emily Marks is also an artist. She is deeply conscious of the details around her. At The Bachelor Farmer, she revels in the restaurant’s mission to build relationships with small farms and producers. She notices when the hue of her egg yolks changes her lemon curd to neon yellow, and when the shells change from thin to thick and brittle.

She’s rewritten recipes to account for the different types of wheat in her Baker’s Field flour. What one baker could view as an annoying inconsistency, Marks finds inspiring. She understands that the grain supply changes with the weather and the farmers.

As a pastry chef, she focuses on what’s in season or what she has preserved over the summer. As an artist, she plays with the tangible elements of her world, bending flavors, pushing limits. But she’s eager to play with more than your taste buds; she wants to provoke a feeling in you or a memory of something you’ve had in the past. Her medium is food, but her work is in nostalgia.

UPBRINGING

HEAVY TABLE: What was your culinary upbringing like?

MARKS: My parents adopted me from Korea when I was four months old. I grew up in White Bear Lake. My earliest memories are mostly around food. My parents were hardworking and didn’t prepare fancy food for us, but my dad had a routine of reading cookbooks every morning like someone would read the newspaper. When I was old enough, I started reading them with him.

In one of my most vivid childhood memories, I was looking up at our kitchen countertop, every inch filled with strawberries from Pine Tree Apple Orchard. To this day, every time I smell strawberries, my mind flashes back to that memory, and I think of the summers our countertops would be filled with the berries that my sister and I would help my dad make into quick jams to put on toast and to give as gifts.

Chelsea Korth / Heavy Table

In high school, I read cookbooks and food magazines and watched a lot of public TV like Martha Stewart and Julia Child. I got kitchen appliances for birthday gifts. I still have my tiny white KitchenAid mixer I’ve had for twenty years. It’s super old-school and has been through a lot, but it still works just fine. Every time I pull it out, I think of how small and old it is. I still love it. After a day working in a commercial kitchen with huge equipment, coming home to bake with it feels a bit like using an Easy-Bake Oven.

HEAVY TABLE: Did you know what you wanted to be when you grew up?

MARKS: From a young age, when someone would ask me what I wanted to be when I grew up, I’d tell them I wanted to stay at home and have a lemonade stand in the yard. When high school graduation came along, I was less sure. I really didn’t like school or the idea of more of it. I was involved in the fine arts in high school and thought it was fun, but I still didn’t feel like I was passionate enough about anything. Culinary school should’ve been obvious, but it was not on my radar.

I ended up going to college at Northwestern, a super-tiny Bible school in St. Paul. It was nice at the time, and had a small art department with really great instructors. I focused on drawing and painting and gravitated toward nature in my work. At the end of college, I was more into abstract expressionist and minimalist art; the things that look easy but are super complex. It’s the same for me now with baking.

In college I think I kind of drove my roommates crazy. We had these tiny kitchenettes in our dorm rooms where I made kimchi once. I probably stank up the whole hall. My roommates didn’t make fun of me, probably because I also often baked them treats. I remember hand-whipping cream for a whipped-cream topping and my roommates were completely amazed.

The Crackers at Terzo, and Thoughts on the Waning of the Bread Basket

Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table
Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table

They’re a sixteenth-of-an-inch thick, crisp (but chewy when you hit a raisin), and sweetly musky from rosemary. The crackers in the bread basket at Terzo are the things we think of first when planning a visit to the South Minneapolis restaurant. The biscottilike crisps go well with wine, cheese, and salumi, and can even stand in for dessert.

They were discovered by Danny Broder — a second-generation member of the family whose restaurants and deli dominate the intersection of Penn and 50th — when he was in northern Italy studying culinary arts and getting experience in restaurant kitchens. The crackers were served at a restaurant he worked at in Piedmont, and he adapted the recipe for Terzo.

Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table
Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table

The crisps wouldn’t be the same without the assistance of a large, fire-engine-red, hand-cranked prosciutto slicer like the one Broder saw on his trip. The family decided to order their own for Terzo’s kitchen. The thing is sharp and accurate, and in addition to serving its intended role, it slices the baked, raisin-filled loaves into prosciutto-thin crackers that go back to the oven for a final baking on their way to Terzo’s bread basket.

Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table
Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table

Sometimes it seems that bread service is fading into history, perhaps as a result of the gluten-free trend compounded by the tough economics of running a restaurant. Where bread is offered, it often comprises a few small slices served after the order is taken and quickly removed when the food arrives. But some establishments — Restaurant Alma and Lucia’s (photo below) come to mind, along with Terzo — are offering a creative assortment of house-made breads. We’ve seen this more often in the Bay Area, where it also appears that restaurants are competing to serve the best house-made butter as an accompaniment.

Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table
Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table

There’s much excellent bread to be found at local bakeries — Patisserie 46, Rustica, Aki’s, Baker’s Field, to name a few — and their breads are served at restaurants around town (when bread is served), but few restaurants make their own, and this leads to a certain predictability.

We usually don’t eat bread with our dinners at home, but one of the pleasures of dining out is biting into a fresh, wheaty slice with just the right amount of cultured butter, and maybe a grain or two of excellent salt. So we’re hoping that the bread (and cracker) basket has a long, yeasty life.

Terzo, 2221 W 50th St, Minneapolis, MN 55419; 612.925.0330

Heavy Table Hot Five: Oct. 7-13

hotfive-flames

Each Friday, this list will track five of the best things Heavy Table’s writers, editors, and photographers have recently bitten or sipped. Have a suggestion for the Hot Five? Email editor@heavytable.com.

shepherd-song-banner-ad-horiz-3The Hot Five is a weekly feature created by the Heavy Table and supported by Shepherd Song Farm.

shepherd-song-green-keyline

James Norton / Heavy Table
James Norton / Heavy Table

1-new - oneCity Loaf from Fire and Flour Bread
The City Loaf from the newly established Fire and Flour Community Bread is a handmade, seriously robust, but also seriously utile baked good. Its crust is substantial (your bread knife had better come correct), but its interior is a lovely balance between depth of flavor and mellow, mild approachability. And while it’s dense stuff, it’s yielding and a lovely partner to toppings such as jam or butter. It would serve well as sandwich bread for robust fillings without swamping them in either texture or taste.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by James Norton]

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table
Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

2-new - twoRaspberry Rhubarb Pimm’s and Blueberry Bourbon Sage Jams from Serious Jam
The raspberry rhubarb Pimm’s is more sauce than jam, with chunks of rhubarb swimming in raspberries. It has the bracing tartness of rhubarb, the sweetness of ripe berries, and just a hint of the medicinal quality of Pimm’s. The blueberry bourbon sage has the prominent spice of bourbon and whole, cooked blueberries. With its sage, this jam would lend itself well to a savory application, though both jams were excellent on whole grain or sourdough bread.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from a story by Ted Held]

James Norton / Heavy Table
James Norton / Heavy Table

3-new - threeMaple Caramel from the St. Croix Chocolate Company
Despite its cheerfully exotic location in Marine on Saint Croix, the St. Croix Chocolate Company can throw down with the best of anything in the greater metro area. We appreciate their artful take on chocolate that mixes first-rate product with stunning visual effects (like sculptural bars modeled on clay tiles). Case in point: the skillfully painted, leaf-shaped chocolates containing a subtle but truly soulful maple caramel that arrived in a hand-painted dark chocolate pumpkin to promote Caramelpalooza on Oct. 15. The chocolate shop’s pear caramel was also an edible work of art — rarely have fruit and chocolate had such a civil conversation.
[Last Week on the Hot Five: #1 | Submitted from Twitter by James Norton]

Katie Cannon / Heavy Table
Katie Cannon / Heavy Table

4-new fourBurrata at Barbette
The classic Italian cheese is elevated by Barbette’s sublime preparation. Piercing the delicate shell of mozzarella reveals stringy filata and cream, and as delicious as burrata is on its own, the accompaniments make the dish. Wild mushrooms, truffled “baby” peaches, and a pistachio pistou surround the pillow of cheesy goodness. Bring a friend and ask for some extra garlic baguette.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Bjorn Christianson]

James Norton / Heavy Table
James Norton / Heavy Table

5-new -fiveHarvest Moon Latte at Peace Coffee
The Harvest Moon Latte goes something like this: Seasonally fresh squash (rotated by the week depending on what’s best) is roasted and pureed with brown sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Then that base is drowned in steamed milk and finally topped with a shot of espresso. The squash is mellow, gently earthy, and present without being overpowering, and it’s a great upgrade to the lazy, pumpkin-spiced everything that currently rules our world.
[Last Week on the Hot Five: #3 | Submitted by James Norton]

Heavy Table Hot Five: Sep. 30-Oct. 6

hotfive-flames

Each Friday, this list will track five of the best things Heavy Table’s writers, editors, and photographers have recently bitten or sipped. Have a suggestion for the Hot Five? Email editor@heavytable.com.

shepherd-song-banner-ad-horiz-3The Hot Five is a weekly feature created by the Heavy Table and supported by Shepherd Song Farm.

shepherd-song-green-keyline

James Norton / Heavy Table
James Norton / Heavy Table

1-new - oneMaple Caramel from the St. Croix Chocolate Company
Despite its cheerfully exotic location in Marine on Saint Croix, the St. Croix Chocolate Company can throw down with the best of anything in the greater metro area. We appreciate their artful take on chocolate that mixes first-rate product with stunning visual effects (like sculptural bars modeled on clay tiles). Case in point: the skillfully painted, leaf-shaped chocolates containing a subtle but truly soulful maple caramel that arrived in a hand-painted dark chocolate pumpkin to promote Caramelpalooza on Oct. 15. The chocolate shop’s pear caramel was also an edible work of art — rarely have fruit and chocolate had such a civil conversation.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from Twitter by James Norton]

Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table
Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table

2-new - twoFresh Ginger at Mill City Farmers Market
Fresh ginger is back at the Mill City Farmers Market. You can find the spicy, fragrant rhizome at the Stone’s Throw and Seven Songs booths. This ginger is both more tender and hotter than the grocery-store version and is perfect for crystallizing. This year, the farmers have also grown galangal and turmeric, similarly hard-to-cultivate (in Minnesota, at least) plants in the ginger family.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Jane Rosemarin]

James Norton / Heavy Table
James Norton / Heavy Table

3-new - threeHarvest Moon Latte at Peace Coffee
The Harvest Moon Latte goes something like this: Seasonally fresh squash (rotated by the week depending on what’s best) is roasted and pureed with brown sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg, and then that base is drowned in steamed milk and finally topped with a shot of espresso. The squash is mellow, gently earthy, and present without being overpowering, and it’s a great upgrade to the lazy pumpkin-spiced everything that currently rules our world.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by James Norton]

James Norton / Heavy Table
James Norton / Heavy Table

4-new fourBanh Chao Quay from Ha Tien
The Banh Chao Quay at Ha Tien, a Vietnamese-by-way-of-St. Paul spin on a classic Chinese doughnut, is a modern miracle. Graced with a lightly crisp exterior and a chewy, tender interior that directly recall a classic beignet, this pastry — plus a bit of powdered sugar and some coffee — would make a lovely breakfast for three to four people, for $1.59. And it’s kind of marvelous to look at, too.
[Last Week on the Hot Five: #1 | Submitted from Instagram by James Norton]

Amy Rea / Heavy Table
Amy Rea / Heavy Table

5-new -fiveBagels from Baker’s Field Flour
The bagels from Baker’s Field Flour (found at the Mill City and Northeast farmers markets) are a wonderful way to start the day. The plain bagel is far from flavorless. The natural leavening gives it a tang akin to sourdough, and it’s also got a pleasantly nutty whole-grain undertone. Cream cheese optional (but why not?).
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Amy Rea]

Baker’s Field Flour & Bread

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table
Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

Northeast Minneapolis’ Food Building, already home to The Lone Grazer Creamery and Red Table Meat Co., now has another local, food-based operation that more than fits with these cheese and meat producers: It’s Baker’s Field Flour & Bread, a local flour mill and commercial bakery.

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table
Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

Baker’s Field is the result of a collaboration between Steve Horton, a founder, former owner, and baker at Rustica Bakery and Kieran Folliard, a restaurateur and founder of 2 Gingers. Horton is hands-on in the business, working as head miller and baker. He noted that going from baking to milling might seem kind of a reverse direction, but it was a decision rooted in the question, “How do we go back to controlling the sourcing and processing of what we need to bake?”

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table
Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

For Horton, that starts with procuring grains grown in Minnesota, Michigan, and North and South Dakota and milling them into flours — primarily a whole-grain wheat flour and a bread flour — half of which are supplied to restaurants including Restaurant Alma, The Bachelor Farmer, and Spoon and Stable. The rest is used for Baker’s Field’s own breads as well as retail sales. The miller also works with buckwheat, corn, rye, spelt, and oat flours.

Bike-Powered Food by Wheelhouse and Brake Bread

Banner for the Tap: Food and Drink News

Readers: Win The Secret Atlas of North Coast Food

The Tap loves restaurant tips from readers, so we’re awarding a copy of The Secret Atlas of North Coast Food to the best tipster of March and April. The Tap is the metro area’s comprehensive restaurant buzz roundup, so if you see a new or newly shuttered restaurant, or anything that’s “coming soon,” email Tap editor James Norton at editor@heavytable.com.

Wheelhouse via Kickstarter.com
Wheelhouse via Kickstarter.com

Wheelhouse (Kickstarter in progress) and Brake Bread (soft opening in progress)

The Minneapolis-St. Paul area has a nationally renowned bike culture (Bicycling Magazine named Minneapolis its #1 Bike City in 2011, the praises of Minnesota’s “bike economy” have been sung, and so forth) but that hasn’t yet really translated to bike-powered food culture.

Emphasis on “yet.” Two new enterprises are seeking to tap into Minnesota’s love of two-wheeled transport and craft food in very different ways.

Wheelhouse is still in the Kickstarter funding phase of its launch, but its progress thus far suggests that it’s tapping into a very real and underserved market. Wheelhouse aims to serve healthy and substantial food to bikers (and runners) attending events around the state. “We’ve only launched the Kickstarter for a little over a week now and we’re booked at 10 events with no marketing,” says Wheelhouse co-founder and biker Andy Lageson. “We’re shooting for the first summer, probably about 50 events.” He sees the venture as filling a void.

“There’s nowhere to hang out and there’s no food options [at these events],” says Lageson. “You’re often just way out in the middle of nowhere in the country. Sometimes you’re rushing from work on a work night and you don’t have time to eat, so we decided, let’s get some food out there.”

Lageson’s partners are Max Becker (whose experience doing a Kickstarter for his band Lovely Dark served as a template for the Wheelhouse push) and former Hell’s Kitchen chef Joe Wuestenhagen. The Wheelhouse plan is to use Joe’s culinary knowledge to provide three broad categories of eats at various cycling and athletic events around the state.

Wheelhouse via Kickstarter.com
Wheelhouse via Kickstarter.com

“Part of it’ll be lighter stuff for people racing — simple proteins and carbs that’s light so you can actually eat it 30 minutes before you race, and it’ll get you through,” says Lageson. “We’ll have snacks for spectators, stuff like olive oil and curry sauteed mix nuts, and handmade jerkies, and stuff like that. And there’ll be an after-race component, like pulled pork sandwiches and more substantial food. Curry hotdishes, potato salads … stuff like that.”

“We’re trying to do everything as green as possible. It’ll be pop-up kitchen style. It’ll all be done on an event catering license. Our infrastructure will be pop-up tents. We won’t be using generators — we’ve got a rechargeable car-battery powered system with power converters that will run all the warmers and heaters.”

Via brakebread.com
Via brakebread.com

Brake Bread puts bread on wheels

Wheelhouse will bring bread (metaphorically) to bikers; Brake Bread uses bikes to bring bread (literally) to its customers. The baking company / delivery service uses a subscription model to bring bread to nearly 50 customers in a limited delivery zone along St. Paul’s West 7th St. corridor, charging $18 a month for four loaves of bread, one delivered each Wednesday.

Break Bread is the brainchild of friends Nate Houge and Micah Taylor. The business, says Taylor, is “a nice extension of slowing down and connecting with neighbors. One of my favorite parts of the business is when I get to hand a loaf to someone when they’re home.”

“One of the things that frames all of this is looking at limitation and sustainability,” says Houge. “It works really well to deliver within our neighborhood here in St. Paul along the West 7th corridor, and to do a subscription service where you know how much to bake for each round. And it worked to do it on bicycles to keep it local that way.”

The company offers two kinds of bread on an alternating biweekly basis: a rustic white bread called Single Speed and a whole wheat sunflower seed oatmeal bread called Granny Gear. A rye sourdough and a natural leavened bread are both on the near horizon for the company, which is also exploring using drop points (like bikeshops) to reach into neighborhoods like Highland Park and deeper into St. Paul proper.

In the meantime, Houge and Taylor are using goggles and studded tires to ride out the remaining shreds of winter, and enjoying the fun of bringing bread to customers’ doors. “So many times you knock on the door, the door opens, and there are these big smiles,” says Houge. “‘The bread guys are here! The bread guys are here!’ My second trial run, I can just remember this woman opened the door and she was clapping her hands and jumping. When does that happen? I’ve never had a job where people will jump and clap … well, that’s not true. I used to teach pre-school, and they would jump and clap.”

NOW OPEN

Kate N.G. Sommers/Heavy Table
Kate N.G. Sommers/Heavy Table

Coup-detat-8

CLOSED / CLOSING:

  • Sunsets Wayzata
  • Chez Arnaud (White Bear Lake)
  • Singapore, 5554 34th Ave S, Minneapolis
  • Birchwood Cafe | Closed for renovation, reopening late spring.
  • La Chaya Bistro, 4537 Nicollet Ave, Minneapolis
  • Serlin’s Cafe, 1124 Payne Ave, St. Paul
  • Sally’s Saloon and Eatery, 712 Washington Ave SE | Closed for remodeling until summer 2014.
  • Buster’s on 28th, 4204 S 28th Ave, Minneapolis | Temporary closure due to mid-2013 fire; unclear when reopening will take place

COMING UP:

Minneapolis

  • Kyoto Sushi (new location), in former Tiger Sushi spot at Lyn-Lake | Spring 2014
  • Hola Arepa (bricks and mortar), South Minneapolis | Early May
  • Lago Tacos, old Heidi’s location, Minneapolis
  • Corner Table projects: relocation to old La Chaya Bistro space and opening of mid-South / fried chicken restaurant | Spring 2014
  • Aki’s Bread Haus, 2506 Central Ave NE, Minneapolis | Late April at earliest
  • Hen House, 114 S 8th St (old Peter’s Grill location), Minneapolis | Spring 2014
  • Bent Arrow, 5416 Penn Ave S, Minneapolis
  • Lyn 65 Kitchen and Bar, 6439 Lyndale Ave, Richfield | Late March / Early April
  • Betty Danger’s Country Club, 2519 Marshall St, Minneapolis | Opening date unknown
  • Russell and Desta Klein projects: Brasserie Zentral, Cafe Zentral, Foreign Legion wine bar, wine shop to be named, Soo Line Building | 2014
  • Heyday, 2702 Lyndale Ave, Minneapolis | Opens April 2014
  • Ling & Louie’s Kitchen, 9th St and Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis
  • The Nicollet Diner, 1428 Nicollet Ave S, Minneapolis | Late Spring 2014
  • Tiny Diner, 1014 E 38th St, Minneapolis | 612.822.6302
  • Unnamed Gastrotruck restaurant, 2400 University Ave NE, Minneapolis | Opens 2013

St. Paul

  • Saint Dinette, Lowertown, St. Paul | Opens April
Courtesy Urban Growler
Courtesy Urban Growler

Greater Twin Cities Area

  • Lolo American Kitchen | March 2014
  • Peace Coffee Coffee Bar, Lakewinds Coop, Richfield, MN | June 2014
  • Victor’s, 205 Water St, Excelsior, MN | Spring 2014
  • Maple Island Brewing Co., Stillwater, MN | May 2014
  • LTD (Live the Dream) Brewing, 812 Mainstreet, Hopkins, MN | March 2014
  • Castle Danger Brewery, Two Harbors brewery expansion and taproom | 2014
  • Jordan Brewery, Jordan, MN | Spring 2014
  • Tin Whiskers Brewing Co., St. Paul | Opens 2014

The Tap is the Heavy Table’s guide to area restaurant openings, closings, and other major events. The Tap is compiled and published biweekly by the Heavy Table. If you have tips for The Tap, please email James Norton at editor@heavytable.com.

Readers: Win The Secret Atlas of North Coast Food

The Tap loves restaurant tips from readers, so we’re awarding a copy of “The Secret Atlas of North Coast Food” to the best tipster of March and April. The Tap is the metro area’s comprehensive restaurant buzz roundup, so if you see a new or newly shuttered restaurant, or anything that’s “coming soon,” email Tap editor James Norton at editor@heavytable.com.

Wasabi and Steak Stew and Recipe Roundup

Wasabi and steak stew, soupe au pistou, roasted carrot (or pumpkin) cumin soup, garlic toasts, and whole wheat sandwich bread.

The Artisan Bread of Pony Farm Food in Bemidji, MN

Rob Yuretich / Heavy Table

John Forrest expertly hefts bright red insulated sacks, the kind used by pizza delivery people, onto his shoulder. You won’t find pizza in these sacks, though — instead, there are several two-pound loaves of fluffy sourdough, each in its own round shaping basket. Forrest is carrying his load of dough with the careful nonchalance of an experienced server balancing a heavy tray of plates on one hand, as he moves toward his destination: a European-style wood-burning oven just 35 feet from the door of Pony Farm Artisan Bread.

John and his wife, Dotty, will tell you they are just as surprised as all of their friends that after they sold the RV park they owned for 14 years in Ogilvie, MN, they moved north and became artisan bread bakers in Bemidji.

Pony Farm Food LLC is owned by Dotty Forrest’s brother-in-law, Dave Olderman. He bought the 40-acre farm about 14 years ago — it came with a Shetland pony and a house that’s almost 100 years old. Olderman sold the pony but kept the farmhouse and turned it into a bakery that officially opened for business on January 1, 2012. Now, the full-time bakers are selling 90 to 100 loaves each week for $8 a loaf. The Forrests believe that number will continue to increase as tourist season eases into high gear in northern Minnesota.

Rob Yuretich / Heavy Table

The spark for creating the bakery was struck by an article in a 1995 issue of Smithsonian magazine. Olderman, retired from a career in finance, was impressed by the magazine’s story of Lionel Poilane, acclaimed as the world’s best bread baker.

It’s no easy feat to recreate Poilane’s efforts in the (sometimes) frozen North, but Olderman has made allowances for the local climate. So that the oven will hold its heat on cold winter days, it is housed in a building that looks like a tiny cabin. The oven, however, is just the end of the process that creates Pony Farm’s bread. The magic starts at about 11 o’clock the night before baking, when John Forrest leaves the bakery where he and Dotty have been mixing dough and adding water and organic flour to the starter.

Rob Yuretich / Heavy Table

The flours used are milled just a couple of hours from Bemidji at Natural Way Mills in Middle River, MN. The baker then loads the oven with wood harvested from local forests.

The next day, as the oven continues to heat, the Forrests work with the sourdough that gets its rising power from starter that originated 250 years ago in New England. In a bright room lined on facing sides with windows, John weighs the dough, making sure each creamy, soft, voluptuous mound is exactly two pounds. He hands the dough over to Dotty, who shapes on the thick slab of wood that tops their baker’s table. She positions a small wooden cut-out of a horse exactly in the center of a cloth-lined bread basket and gently places a hefty round of dough on top of it.

All-Purpose Bread and Recipe Roundup

Irish cheddar mac and cheese with bacon, creamy cauliflower soup, pan-fried chickpeas with kale and garlic, chocolate walnut and oatmeal cookies, a meatloaf sandwich, soda bread with herbed goat cheese, lentil soup, and all-purpose bread.

Chicken Wild Rice Soup with Bacon and Recipe Roundup

Cranberry pecan boule, pavlovas, chicken with wild rice soup and bacon, homemade yogurt, curried wild rice with lentils, sweet basil cheesecake with honey, and cut out sugar cookies.

Steel-Cut Oatmeal Bread and Recipe Roundup

Lemon fluff, orange-scented cauliflower soup, cornbread, oatmeal cookies, kohlrabi recipes a-go-go, steel-cut oatmeal bread, dhal makhani, Irish brown soda bread, and fig shallot pizza.

Risen Wheat Bread with Bananas and Cinnamon and Recipe Roundup

Cranberry-lime cookies, caramelized veggies with couscous, Thai-style Brussels sprouts, risen wheat bread with bananas and cinnamon, and smoked fisherman’s pie (no fishermen injured, etc. etc.).