Heavy Table Hot Five: Sep. 8-14

hotfive-flames

Each Friday, this list will track five of the best things Heavy Table’s writers, editors, and photographers have recently bitten or sipped. Have a suggestion for the Hot Five? Email editor@heavytable.com.

shepherd-song-banner-ad-horiz-3The Hot Five is a weekly feature created by the Heavy Table and supported by Shepherd Song Farm.

shepherd-song-green-keyline

Joshua Page / Heavy Table

1-new - one - hot fiveThe Kingfield Gobbler at Sun Street Breads
If you enjoy leftover Thanksgiving turkey sandwiches, you’ll likely dig the Kingfield Gobbler. There’s really not much too it — just a mound of super juicy pulled turkey, mayo, and veg on a wheat bun. It’s simple comfort food at its best. Pro-tip: Order a side of barbecue sauce to add a little zip.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Joshua Page]

Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table

Jane Rosemarin / Heavy Table

2-new - two - hot fiveMasa Cake at Restaurant Alma
I’ve been reading Daniel Patterson’s The Art of Flavor. It’s about how flavors, textures, cooking methods, and other factors play off one another. The masa cake at Restaurant Alma is an example of how it works. The cake itself has a creamy center — but not without a bite — and a surface that’s fried crisp. The smoked chicken and the mole share their warm, deep flavors, while the cilantro and pickled onions add a sharp brightness. Altogether this was a deft combination of numerous excellent ingredients disguised as a simple, comforting dish.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Jane Rosemarin]

James Norton / Heavy Table

3-new - three hot fiveMini-Pop Tarts by Duluth’s Best Bread at Chef Camp
If you’re starting camp at 6:30 in the morning, as some guests at Chef Camp do, you need something with a bit of sweetness and substance to help you into the waking world. Enter the mini “pop tart,” cooked on site by the guest bakers of Duluth’s Best Bread. These jam-filled, iced pastries are surprisingly light and delicate, with none of the cardboardlike bulk of their commercial namesakes. These seemingly humble pastries were shockingly good.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by James Norton]

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

4-new four hot fiveFrench Fries at Fat Chance
Brooklyn Park’s Fat Chance is known for its sandwiches (which we’ll tell you about on Monday), but it should also be noted that they know a thing or two about French fries. Lightly crispy on the outside, hot and fluffy on the inside, and served with a house-made dipping sauce that involves mayo and sriracha, these are worth the trip all by themselves.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from a review to appear Monday by Amy Rea]

Ted Held / Heavy Table

5-new -fiveBlissful Ignorance Double IPA by Lupulin Brewing
The appropriately named Blissful Ignorance double IPA by Big Lake’s Lupulin Brewing is an excellent example of the style. The taste and aroma (even from an unsanctioned kind of glass, tsk, tsk) is a delightful blend of tropical fruit and pine that all but masks the 9.0 percent ABV. If you are having only one beer with your video games, technical manuals, or whatever helps you relax at the end of a long day, this is a mighty fine choice.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Ted Held]



The Croissant at Bellecour in Wayzata

James Norton / Heavy Table

Besieged by hype about Bellecour (and its bakery) we made our way out to Wayzata a couple of weekends ago to snag a breakfast of pastries and coffee. If you know good bakeries, you know the feeling we had when we walked into Bellecour — it was a Patisserie 46 feeling, a Rustica feeling, a Bachelor Farmer feeling — that sense that everything in the shop had a crisp, buttery, just-so thing going on, and that every bite was going to be good. An assortment of baked goods proved that feeling correct, but the plain old croissant was the best of a lovable bunch.

A really great croissant is almost a contradiction — soft and buttery yet cunningly woven from seemingly hundreds of distinct crispy, crunchy, delicate layers of pastry. It almost disintegrates in your mouth, crumbling and melting with every bite. It’s one of the best foods humanity’s yet devised, but it doesn’t come easy — making a really good croissant takes time, patience, and technique, and from tasting the croissant at Bellecour it’s evident that they have plenty of all three.

Bellecour is a long drive for me (about 25 minutes), and there are equally good versions of everything they do in Minneapolis proper, which isn’t hurting for good bakeries. Except … the croissant. The croissant is going to be the siren song that takes me an hour out of my way, sometime soon, to taste those buttery layers again.

Bellecour, 739 Lake St E, Wayzata; 952.444.5200



Green Bee Juicery

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

If you’ve got a food-based business, and you decide it’s time to sell, you might want to look at the sales strategy of the former owner of Minneapolis’ Green Bee Juicery: Find your most ardent customers, the ones who fervently promote your company of their own free will, and ask if they’d like to buy it.

That’s how Michaela Smith and Mallory Madden came to be the owners of the three-year-old cold-pressed raw juice company. “We first encountered Green Bee at the Linden Hills Farmers Market and immediately noticed the way the juice stood out compared to other cold-pressed juices we had tried before,” says Madden. “We preached the word of Green Bee everywhere we went. So when the current owner decided she wanted to move on from the business, she approached the two of us about taking it over. She wanted the company to be in the hands of people who supported the product, and we definitely did that.” In June 2016, they entered into a purchase agreement, and by January 2017, Green Bee was theirs.

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

Neither Smith nor Madden had a food-industry background, but they are science and health professionals; Smith is a licensed psychologist who focuses on integrative health, and Madden has a master’s degree in public health. Acknowledging that they have to be careful not to make health claims, they believe firmly in the value of raw juice, and they research each potential product and ingredient. “Our products have between three and five pounds of fresh produce in each jar,” says Smith. “There’s no added water. It’s all fruit and veggies.” They source their produce locally as much as possible.

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

Currently, Green Bee products are available at the Northeast Farmers Market on Saturdays through the season and at the City Food Studio in Minneapolis on Tuesday evenings and Saturday mornings. Or juice fans in some areas can sign up for a membership with Green Bee that provides discounts and offers delivery. Coming this fall: Smith and Madden have just signed a lease on a storefront and will be opening a retail location. That will give them a wider public face, since raw juices can’t be sold wholesale — one reason is their short shelf life; most juices have only three to five days for safe consumption.

Still, if no one likes the taste, the juices wouldn’t go far. Green Bee’s proprietors understand that. We sampled most of their product line, some of which was developed by the original owner, with new additions from Madden and Smith. We found that Green Bee manages to avoid the “drink it; it’s good for you; ignore the taste” pitfall that some plant beverages can have. Especially notable on that front is the Smooth Beets, which has a strong sweetness offset by the addition of ginger, lemon, and cucumber, all of which keep the taste from becoming saccharine. But even better, there’s no hint of the earthy taste beets sometimes impart. Even the non-beet-lover who tried it was pleasantly surprised.

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

Another unexpected offering was the Power Greens. Raw kale and collard could be expected to overpower the flavor here, but instead, apple shines, with a faint taste of cucumber, making this a milder drink than expected. The Turmeric Glow is a bright, cheerful shade of orange and has a strong orange-juice flavor with a nice kick of ginger. For those who prefer less kick from their juice, the seasonal Watermelon Cooler is summery sweet and light, with just a hint of cucumber, and chia seeds stand in for watermelon seeds for a particularly attractive presentation.

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

The real rock ’em, sock ’em drink is the Power Shot. Made from fresh-pressed ginger root, lemon, raw honey, and cayenne, this is a powerhouse of a drink that is not for the faint of heart — but if you like intense flavor (and we do), this one’s for you. It’s strongly ginger-forward, which transitions to lemon and finally to a light cayenne afterburn. No caffeine, but a definite wake-up call on its own.

Green Bee also has a line of nut milks, which are free of dairy and added sugar. The Vanilla Cashew Milk is a sophisticated yet mild concoction, gentle and refreshing, with a pleasantly nutty aftertaste. For those craving a sweeter flavor, the Strawberry Cashew Milk contains the same ingredients with the addition of the fruit. It also has a slightly gritty texture that’s not off-putting.

Juices and milks are available in various sizes from pints ($10) to 16-packs (4 juices per week for four weeks, $155) to three-day cleansing packages ($175-$190) to half-growlers ($36) and growlers ($72). Power Shots are $3 and $20 for 2 ounces and 16 ounces respectively.

Green Bee Juicery, City Food Studio, 3722 Chicago Ave S, Minneapolis, 55407. Email for more information: orders@greenbeejuicery.com



The Tap: Early September Restaurant Openings and Closings

Banner for the Tap: Food and Drink News

This week in the Tap: A look ahead at upcoming restaurants in the greater Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area, notes about spots that have closed, and about those that have recently opened.

The Tap is the metro area’s comprehensive restaurant buzz roundup, so if you see a new or newly shuttered restaurant, or anything that’s “coming soon,” email Tap editor James Norton at editor@heavytable.com.

NOW OPEN:

James Norton / Heavy Table

  • Seventh Street Truck Park, 214 W 7th St, St. Paul | A food hall with a rotating collection of trucks and three separate bars. Our review here.
  • Bardo, 222 E Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis | A new “modern American bistro” in the old Rachel’s spot in Northeast, with chef/owner Remy Pettus.
  • Tillie’s Farmhouse, 232 Cleveland Ave N, St. Paul | Seasonal cuisine, some of it with a Scandinavian influence, with ingredients from local farms. In the former Trotter’s Cafe.
  • Wonders Ice Cream, 298 University Ave W, St. Paul | A shop selling the latest craze (?): rolled ice cream. See also: Sota Hot and Cold at 394 University Ave W.
  • Delicata1341 Pascal St, St. Paul | A pizzeria and gelateria by Matty O’Reilly, J.D. Fratzke, and Noah Barton.
  • Kaiseki Furukawa, 33 1st Ave N, Minneapolis | Classic kaiseki (progressive small courses) dining at Kaiseki Furukawa, sister restaurant to Kado no Mise. $168 per plate (including gratuity and tax).
  • Barrel Theory Beer Company, 248 E 7th St, St. Paul | As per the Growler: “A partnership between Surly Brewing Company’s former director of technology Brett Splinter, former Surly brewer Timmy Johnson, and CPA Todd Tibesar.” Our preview is here.

Becca Dilley / Lake Superior Flavors

  • Hoops Brewing, 325 S Lake Ave, Duluth | Expectations have been high for this new brewery, a project of Dave Hoops, formerly of Fitger’s. And our first tastes indicate those expectations were warranted.
  • 12welve Eyes Brewing, 141 E 4th St, St. Paul | Brewery and taproom in the Pioneer Endicott Building in Lowertown. Our overview is here.


Heavy Table Hot Five: Sep. 1-7

hotfive-flames

Each Friday, this list will track five of the best things Heavy Table’s writers, editors, and photographers have recently bitten or sipped. Have a suggestion for the Hot Five? Email editor@heavytable.com.

shepherd-song-banner-ad-horiz-3The Hot Five is a weekly feature created by the Heavy Table and supported by Shepherd Song Farm.

shepherd-song-green-keyline

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

1-new - one - hot fiveLefse Good Times Roll at the Rabbit Hole at the Minnesota State Fair
It’s a shame that this lefse + cream cheese + marshmallow + almond brittle + roasted pineapple + mint hand roll wasn’t available at the start of the fair, because it might have topped our list. Between its creamy-chewy texture, the lovely crunch of the brittle, and the brightness of the mint, this is a dessert dish we’ve never tried before, and one we’d like to try again and again due to its perfect balance and the novelty “wow” factor. Seek it out while you can — the fair ends soon.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by James Norton]

Joshua Page / Heavy Table

2-new - two - hot fiveCrispy Tilapia with Mango Salad at On’s Kitchen
This dish made us fall in love with On’s all over again. The large whole tilapia was exquisitely fried — crunchy exterior, juicy interior, and not the least bit greasy. Bright, balanced, and beautiful, the mango salad was equally impressive. When combined, the fried fish and fresh salad made each other even better. Even at $22, this dish seemed like a deal.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Joshua Page]

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

3-new - three hot fiveShrimp and Grits at the Kenwood
The Kenwood’s Shrimp and Grits with bacon, shiitakes, poached egg and K-Mama* sauce, priced at $15, is substantial on many levels. We were a little cautious about the K-Mama sauce overpowering the cheesy/creamy texture of the grits, but this was not the case. There was a perfect balance between heat, spice, and texture. The bacon/mushroom/caramelized onions sauté planted on top was loaded with flavor and extremely rich all on its own. The poached egg actually toned down the salty-smokeiness. Oh, and yes: There were shrimp. They were perfect, too, but definitely not the hero in this dish. *K-Mama is a high quality, locally produced (in Columbia Heights) Korean sauce.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Brenda Johnson]

James Norton / Heavy Table

4-new four hot fiveBarbacoa Taco at the Seventh Street Truck Park
There was a lot to be skeptical of at the Seventh Street Truck Park between the Guy Fieri-ish bro decor and the endless TVs, but the barbacoa taco actually lived up to the hype. A nice balance of crunchy acid, plenty of decent cotija cheese, and well-seasoned, moist pork made this a taco we’d definitely eat again.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by James Norton]

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

5-new -fiveOle Juan a Rolle at the Rabbit Hole at the Minnesota State Fair
It takes some effort to parse what this dish even is, between the name and the ingredients: it’s a lefse quesadilla with cheese and Kahlúa pork wrapped around pineapple fried rice. Most of what you get is the soothing chewy-crispiness of the lefse and the fried rice, but the warm, full-flavored wads of pork add substance and interest, making this a highly satisfying fair-time entree.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by James Norton]