The Weekend Starts Now: Season 2, Episode 11

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

The Weekend Starts Now podcast taped the eleventh show of its second season at Indeed Brewing Company‘s barrel room on Tuesday, June 21.

This weekly podcast is a joint project of the Heavy Table and Secrets of the City, and it covers art, music, food, drink, culture, and more in the Upper Midwest.

You can follow and listen to the show on Soundcloud, or play the show by following the links below. And you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

The Weekend Starts Now is brought to you by Indeed Brewing Company. Indeed Brewing Company cultivates an artfully eclectic lineup of distinctive flagship beers, well-loved seasonal releases, and adventurous specialty brews from the heart of Northeast Minneapolis. Indeed Brewing: We’re not just brewing beer, We’re crafting experiences. We are thirsty creatures, Indeed. There’s more to explore at www.indeedbrewing.com.

Hear the whole episode here!

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

SEGMENT 1: INTRODUCTION

Wherein James and Taylor talk about bigger and bigger bands stomping around the Minneapolis-St. Paul scene.

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

SEGMENT 2: ADAM THEIS OF INDEED

We talked beer (and sour beer in particular, with all the ins and outs that that topic entails) with brewer Adam Theis of Indeed.

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

Becca Dilley / Heavy Table

SEGMENT 3: ASHLEY GOLD OF HOLIDAE

We were lucky enough to talk to (and be sung to by) one of the best pop singers in the state, Ashley Gold of Holidae.

SEGMENT 4: YOUR WEEKEND STARTS NOW

Everything you need to plan your weekend in Minneapolis-St. Paul.



Brake Bread Bakery on West Seventh in St. Paul

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

There’s something to be said for doing one or two things very well. Brake Bread, a bakery on West Seventh in St. Paul, has got that concept on lockdown. Micah Taylor and Nate Hogue (pictured above) have been honing their bread-making and business skills as a bike delivery bakery for the past few years, pedaling their naturally leavened loaves straight to customers’ doorsteps. Now they finally have a brick-and-mortar shop where you can pick up a hearty loaf of bread (among other things) most days of the week.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brake Bread’s bright and airy little shop is minimal and focused. Tall wire shelves get down to business displaying the day’s bread offerings as well as day-old loaves and big bags of tuppence (aka bits of stale bread to fling to the birds). Most days the bakery is stocked with classics like baguettes ($3), a white sandwich loaf adorably dubbed “Fwuffy” ($5.50), white and whole wheat artisanal loaves, and Granny Gear ($5.50), a brown round that’s stuffed with flax, oats, and sunflower seeds.

The kitchen is currently in experimental mode, cranking out new creations every week to see what sticks. We took home a loaf of Steel the One ($5), a raisin-studded rye with a malty sweetness that we want to devour every morning for breakfast. Toasted, with butter.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brake Bread’s regular rotation is an excellent arsenal of everyday classics. Bread rolls out of the oven around 10 a.m. each day, and each loaf is bursting with that crucial yeasty perfume that separates a great bread from a squishy loaf from Cub. They need no assistance. The baguette is a well-constructed specimen, with a crackly crust and a light, stretchy interior. And the Classic Cruiser ($5) is a delightfully sour white loaf with a crisp crust that’ll keep nicely for a few days. And even after it’s gotten a bit stiff, you’ll find yourself stuffing slices into the toaster to enjoy every last crumb.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Beyond killer bread, the bakery keeps it simple with other goodies. You’ll find an edited collection of cookies and gooey caramel rolls. We were particularly smitten with the Sugar Lime cookie (50 cents each), which is like a soft and chewy cookie version of key lime pie. And Brake Bread’s scones are perfect, with golden outsides and moist but crumbly insides. Try the Snickerdoodle ($2.50)! It’s your childhood. For the non-sweet-tooth, the bakery makes Spinners ($3), which are shaped like cinnamon rolls but are filled with savory ingredients instead. There’s one filled with olives and feta (below) that would make a great sidekick to scrambled eggs.



Much Depends on Dinner: Thoughts on Homegrown Foods and Other Meal-Delivery Services

Tricia Cornell / Heavy Table

Tricia Cornell / Heavy Table

Have we heard the last word on meal delivery services? Are you really hoping we have?

Permit me one more — or 800 more — because I have been thinking a lot about my family’s subscription to Homegrown Foods. Specifically, I have been thinking, “Why on earth do we pay for this service? And why do I love it so much?”

I am not the target demographic for meal delivery services. I’m way too old to have been shopping online since birth. I did not grow up expecting every imaginable good or service to come directly to my door.

I’m not new to the kitchen or intimidated by techniques or ingredients. I am a dedicated, obsessive meal planner. I make grocery lists that are the shopping equivalent of targeted tactical airstrikes. I keep pantry staples on hand that cover most of the world’s major cuisines.

Moreover, there’s no shortage of high-quality food coming into our house. We have year-round CSA shares. We fill our freezer with meats from Ferndale Market. You should see my collection of dried beans.

So, a service that does my meal planning and shopping for me? Why would I outsource the only part of my life I feel like I’m any good at?

That was my thinking when Homegrown Foods offered me a trial box last year. Everything was delicious. But I couldn’t figure out what hole it would fill in my life. Still, every Saturday morning, when I sat down to plan meals for the week, I would think about the convenience and comfort of that box. One particular Saturday this spring, I asked the other three dinner eaters in my household what they might like to eat in the coming week. And all three shrugged their shoulders. “Whatever you make.”

Within three minutes of the last shrug, I was a new Homegrown Foods subscriber, demographics be damned.

Tricia Cornell / Heavy Table

Tricia Cornell / Heavy Table

And now, every other Wednesday, three pre-planned, pre-prepped meals show up in a cooler on our doorstep. Someone else has done all the shopping, a lot of the mixing, some of the chopping. But most importantly, someone else has already done all the thinking.

So much thinking goes into dinner. So much.

Dinner is a big deal in my life. It’s my anchor. If I know what’s for dinner, I can figure everything else out. On Monday morning, when nobody can find their permission slips or their shoes or the almond milk, and I realize I’m not prepped for a 9 a.m. meeting, I can look at the menu on the fridge and know that, no matter what, we are all going to come home at the end of the day and eat something nourishing together.

But sitting down with a whiteboard, a family calendar, a blank grocery list, and a cup of coffee, as I do every Saturday morning, is both a soothing ritual and an exercise that bares all of my privileged 21st-century self-doubts. I can knot myself up a thousand different ways: Are we eating too much meat? Too many carbs? (The easiest solution to that is more meat.) Should we be eating more legumes? (Yes.) More vegetables? (Yes.) More fish? (I give up.)



The Viking Bar in Minneapolis

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

The Viking Bar is back! After a 10-year absence — or silence, rather — the shuttered dive bar on the U of M’s West Bank is open for business again, more than 100 years since it first opened its doors.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

And it’s back with a bang. The outside is still very much a dive bar, but the interior is bright and clean, with warm wood paneling and expanded windows to let in some light. A dropped ceiling was removed, uncovering a pressed tin ceiling that was restored. There are several large TVs over the bar, and we overheard a conversation about televised soccer that indicated the Viking, just a month after reopening, is pulling in regulars who like to watch that other football.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

The Viking has also put together a short but fun menu of sandwiches and drinks, along with a decent list of local beers (the usual favorites — Fulton, Surly, Bent Paddle, Grain Belt). It also has a list of “Fancy Drinks,” and the one that drew our attention was the Pickle Martini ($8.75), a concoction of Prairie Cucumber Vodka shaken with pickle brine and served with sour cornichons. This may not appeal to everyone, but at our table, the pickle enthusiasts were delighted. The sour brine paired beautifully with the cool, fresh cucumber flavor of the vodka.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

When we asked the friendly server what she’d recommend to eat, she noted that Bill’s Boloney sandwich ($10) is currently the top seller, but her favorite was the Tuna Muffaleta ($11). We gave both of them a try and would happily eat either again. The “Boloney” in particular was a standout. The bologna in question has nothing to do with that pressed meat with both a first and last name, but instead comes from Peterson Limousin Beef from Osceola. The meat looked more like corned beef than grocery-store bologna; it was incredibly tender and had a gently beefy and peppery flavor that played well with its accompaniments (Muenster cheese, mustard, bread and butter pickles).

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

The Tuna Muffaleta was delicious too, with albacore tuna holding its own against a zippy giardiniera and a sundried tomato pesto. The giardiniera had a mild heat, nothing to be frightened of. And it paired especially well with the Pickle Martini.

So, welcome back to the Viking. We’re glad you’re here and have brought great sandwiches and drinks. Note: Periodically they offer Spinal Tap karaoke. You know you want to.

Viking Bar
Drinks and well-made sandwiches in Cedar Riverside

1829 Riverside Ave
Minneapolis, MN 55454
612.353.4794
HOURS:
Daily 10 a.m.-2 a.m.
(See website for patio hours)
BAR: Full bar
RESERVATIONS / RECOMMENDED?: No
VEGETARIAN / VEGAN: Yes / No
ENTREE RANGE: $6-$11
NOISE LEVEL: Moderate
PARKING: Day: Metered street parking; Evening: free parking in the neighboring Opitz Outlet lot after 7 p.m.



Heavy Table Hot Five: June 24-30

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Each Friday, this list will track five of the best things Heavy Table’s writers, editors, and photographers have recently bitten or sipped. Have a suggestion for the Hot Five? Email editor@heavytable.com.

shepherd-song-banner-ad-horiz-3The Hot Five is a weekly feature created by the Heavy Table and supported by Shepherd Song Farm.

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James Norton / Heavy Table

James Norton / Heavy Table

1-new - oneHeliotropic Wooden Soul Saison Brett by Indeed Brewing
This week we taped this season’s last edition of our podcast, The Weekend Starts Now, at Indeed Brewing’s barrel room. We feasted on Annie B’s caramels; we were serenaded by Ashley Gold of Holidae (above); and we tasted our way through four of the beers in the sour, funky, wild, and barrel-aged series called Wooden Soul. My favorite: Wooden Soul #1, AKA Heliotropic, coming to bottles soon. A blend of three yeast strains, this dry, bubbly, grapy, slightly funky beer could easily pass for a sparkling wine. Some things do, in fact, get better with age.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]

Ruthie Young / Heavy Table

Ruthie Young / Heavy Table

2-new - twoBone-in Kingston Style Jerk Chicken at Pimento
This tropically spicy menu staple at Pimento does not disappoint — from the fall-off-the-bone, marinated meat to the mounds of coconut rice, Jamaican slaw, and fried sweet plantains it’s served on. For just $9, this hearty meal is a home-cooked steal, and the fast-casual environment had us enjoying the Jamaican fare in no time. Choose one of five homemade sauces. We chose the medium-heat “Minnesota nice,” but next time we’ll ask for a side of the habanero-lime “Kill Dem Wid It,” just for some extra fun.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Ruthie Young]

James Norton / Heavy Table

James Norton / Heavy Table

3-new - threeRotisserie Chicken from The Dirty Bird
Upton 43’s sidecar grab-and-go restaurant is about as simple as they come: a small counter slinging whole and half rotisserie chickens along with a few sides and sauces. We thought our chicken was divine — profoundly moist and tender flesh with a delicate-yet-crispy skin that was practically glowing with hot, spice-rubbed flavor. This is the only chicken we’ve met that can stand up to the wood-fired rotisserie of Holy Land, and that’s saying a lot.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]

James Norton / Heavy Table

James Norton / Heavy Table

4-new fourSweet Child of Vine by Fulton Beer at Chef Camp
This week we got up to Camp Miller to re-explore and start working on a dry run for this September’s Chef Camp retreat. (Five tickets remain; act quickly if you’re intrigued.) Our beer sponsor, Fulton, came with us, and we feasted on lamb and pesto sandwiches on Spoon and Stable bread, fire-roasted asparagus, and — of course — Fulton Beer. Sweet Child of Vine is one of the beers that made the company’s name, and it’s a gorgeous thing to drink in the woods on a summer day. It’s a multidimensional IPA with a lot to say, its flavor built upon a dramatic and ultimately satisfying tension between malt and hops.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]

James Norton / Heavy Table

James Norton / Heavy Table

5-new -fiveBerry Crumble Ice Cream from Sweet Science
Lakewinds Food Co-op dispatched a “flavors of summer” box to our door, and it contained — hallelujah — a pint of Sweet Science ice cream. The timing of this particular flavor wasn’t accidental. Berry Crumble is summer in a cardboard cylinder: whole berries plus crumbly topping plus full-flavored ice cream in a single, convenient package.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by James Norton]