Introducing Chef Camp’s Chef-Instructors: Karl Gerstenberger

Kristen Olson / Quincy Street Kitchen

This post is sponsored by Chef Camp, a three-day cooking retreat to be held in a rustic camp setting from Aug. 31-Sept. 2, 2018 at YMCA Camp Miller.

Chef Camp’s chef-instructors are the heart of the experience. The classes that they teach over open flames are what give the event its soul and purpose. Because of his love for the outdoors, Karl Gerstenberger is a natural fit to teach at camp.

He got his start in some of the best-known restaurants in California, working at Chez Panisse, Stars, and Oliveto. Upon returning to Minnesota several years ago, he took that West Coast haute cuisine background and began applying it to charcuterie, most notably working to establish the Seward Co-op’s meat program as a local leader.

Kristen Olson / Quincy Street Kitchen

You can find Chef Karl at St. Paul’s renovated historic Waldmann Brewery and Wurstery, where he works as head chef and general manager. “We’re getting good feedback from people with deep German cultural roots who are saying that the German food here is bright and great,” says Chef Karl. “We’re not reinventing anything, but we’re upping it through good training and a good palate.”

Chef Karl’s camp credentials mean that he’ll be right at home at YMCA Camp Miller, Chef Camp’s HQ. “I’m a YMCA Camp Menogyn alumnus,” he says. “I did canoeing my first year and then went for another four years, working my way up to the long backpacking trips, and absolutely loving it.”

“Food was a major emphasis,” he adds. “One of the things I did as a camper was put extra effort in on the food. So on the trail, [I did] crazy stuff you shouldn’t try to do with a white gas stove, or on a fire!”

At Chef Camp, look for Chef Karl to teach a two-part class bringing together fine cuisine, camp cooking, and breaking down an animal such as a lamb or goat in order to make a variety of fire-cooked treats.

Tickets to Chef Camp are available now!



Nong’s Thai Cuisine in Golden Valley

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

We got a tip that there was some far-better-than-average Thai food happening in a strip mall in Golden Valley, and decided we’d check it out.

Turns out it was a good call. Nong’s Thai Cuisine is a warm, welcoming eatery that filled up quickly once it opened for the day, and it was clear that many visitors were regulars and known to the staff. One gentleman noticed our photographer at work and came over to ask if we were reviewing Nong’s. When we said we were, he said he eats there just about every week, driving past two other Thai places on the way. Then, noticing that we hadn’t ordered the Tom Yum Soup ($11-$14.50, depending on meat choice), he went over to the buffet and grabbed a small bowl of it for us to try. (It was very good, with a rich broth and a nice undercurrent of heat.)

We asked our friendly server for recommendations, and she steered us in the right direction. The Pad Thai ($11-$14.50) was a solid rendition of the dish every Thai restaurant has, with a lightly sweet sauce and a considerable amount of meat, in our case a mixture of chicken and pork, cooked tender and juicy. The cilantro lover at the table wished for more of that herb, while noting not everyone would agree.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

The Rice Noodle Soup with beef ($10) had a rich, lemongrass-forward broth and the tiniest bit of heat. Thin strips of beef were complemented by soft meatballs and a good amount of garlic oil. It was similar in taste to a traditional pho, with the broth seeming to have been slowly, gently developed. A couple of beef strips were a bit on the gristly side, but most were velvety and beautifully cooked.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

But the dish everyone at the table fell in love with was the Thai Basil Stir Fry with a whole tilapia ($16). It was a showstopper in terms of appearance, with the fried whole fish peeking out from a generous coating of colorful vegetables and bits of minced chilies. It may not be as dramatic as Thai Garden’s River Monster, but it was still impressive to behold.

Even better, it was delicious. The fish had a wonderfully crunchy skin, with the insides flaky and hot, but not dry. We ordered the dish hot and would maybe try Thai hot on a future visit; the heat wasn’t overwhelming, but packed enough of a punch to make us thankful for tall glasses of ice water. The mild fish was enhanced with the addition of the chilies and jalapeño, and the vegetables were crispy and fresh-tasting.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Finishing off the meal with a Thai Iced Coffee ($3) was a sweet way to end a mostly savory meal. The beverage, served in a kitschy Mason jar, was a good blend of strong coffee and condensed milk, refreshing and quenching.

Nong’s Thai Cuisine, 2520 Hillsboro Ave N Golden Valley; 763.404.8190. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Buffet lunch served Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table



Heavy Table Hot Five: April 20-26

hotfive-flames

Each Friday, this list will track five of the best things Heavy Table’s writers, editors, and photographers have recently bitten or sipped. Have a suggestion for the Hot Five? Email editor@heavytable.com.

shepherd-song-banner-ad-horiz-3The Hot Five is a weekly feature created by the Heavy Table and supported by Shepherd Song Farm.

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James Norton / Heavy Table

1-new - one - hot fiveSmorgasbord Plate at The Bungalow Club
We’ve been looking forward to the Craftsman’s successor — a classy but accessible Italian-inspired place called The Bungalow Club — ever since we heard about it a few months ago. It was well worth the wait. The crown jewel of our first visit was a Smorgasbord Plate that did justice to the tremendous charcuterie plates Craftsman chef Mike Phillips used to put out back in the day. The pate was light and airy, the deviled egg spread devilishly delicious (and equally light on the palate), and the pickled veg all profound without being acrid or aggressive.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]

James Norton / Heavy Table

2-new - two - hot fiveBrisket Rice Bowl at Sweet Chow
After our initial review of Sweet Chow but before going on MPR to talk about their food, we decided another visit was in order. We’re glad we went. The food was equally (or more) delicious than on visit number one. The highlight was the Brisket Rice Bowl, which boasted about 10 different condiments (pickled this, that, and the other, kimchi, poached egg, flying fish roe, etc.) and perfectly cooked, beautifully barked slices of brisket. Every bite was different, nourishing, and tasty.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]

James Norton / Heavy Table

3-new - three hot fiveCroque Monsieur at Modern Times
What makes a good croque monsieur? They’re not all alike, but let’s examine the version offered at Modern Times: substantial ham, copious (but not excessive!) cheese, soulful bread; and a good balance of saltiness, meaty savory flavor, and the carbo-richness of the bread. A perfectly dressed and perfectly simple side salad was an unexpected bonus.
[Last Week on the Hot Five: #1 | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]

Paige Latham Didora / Heavy Table

4-new four hot fiveSummit Lazy Sipper
Summit Lazy Sipper — which was part of our great State Fair roundup — is now available in cans. At first taste, the blond-colored beer has the crispness of a Pilsner with the aromatics of a pale ale, but after a few sips, a complex graham cracker malt builds in the back of the mouth. It’s an all-around winner with a crowd-pleasing profile, and it’s only 4.8 percent ABV. Try it with nachos.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Paige Latham Didora]

James Norton / Heavy Table

5-new -fiveJapanese Set Breakfast at JK’s Table
When our copy editor Jane Rosemarin reviewed the breakfast at JK’s Table in Edina, I felt compelled to check her work — not from doubting her palate, but from a years-long curiosity about Japanese breakfasts and an inability to find one anywhere else in the metro. As presented at JK’s, the meal is a remarkably simple but classy way to start the day: grilled fish, rice, two tiny rolled herbed omelets, sesame avocado, and pickled veg. It’s a drive, but I’ll be back.
[Last Week on the Hot Five: #2 | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]



East Lake Checklist: Urban Forage Cidery to Himalayan Restaurant

WACSO / Heavy Table

We’re in the home stretch now. We’ve crossed under Hiawatha Avenue and passed through downtown Longfellow heading east toward the Mississippi River — our end point. There has been a clear change to the landscape: slightly lighter density of businesses, slightly longer stretches between restaurants, slightly more diversity of cuisines (spoiler alert: We will encounter far fewer taquerias and East African eateries from here on out). Also, it’s taking us longer to get through our allotted five visits on each outing. Could it be that we’re subconsciously dragging our feet to push off the inevitable post-checklist letdown? Perhaps. — M.C. Cronin

This week’s checklist crew: WACSO, M.C. Cronin, James Norton

OTHER EAST LAKE STREET CHECKLIST INSTALLMENTS: Lake Plaza, Gorditas el Gordo to Pineda Tacos, Taqueria Victor Hugo to Safari Restaurant, El Sabor Chuchi to The Rabbit Hole, Midtown Global Market, Miramar to San Miguel Bakery, Mercado Central, Ingebretsen’s to Pasteleria Gama, La Alborada to Quruxlow, Midori’s Floating World to El Nuevo Rodeo, Urban Forage to Himalayan, Blue Moon Coffee Cafe to Merlin’s Rest, Hi Lo Diner to The Bungalow Club

WACSO / Heavy Table

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

The East Lake Checklist is the third Heavy Table illustrated travelogue to explore a major gastronomic thoroughfare in Minneapolis and/or St. Paul. The East Lake Checklist is the Heavy Table’s follow-up to our 55-restaurant survey of independent eateries on Central Avenue and our 72-restaurant series about restaurants on the Green Line. We’ll publish five-restaurant installments biweekly until we’ve documented every nonchain spot on East Lake Street between 35W and the Mississippi River. (We’re estimating 75 spots, but we’ll see how it shakes out.)

This series is made possible by underwriting from Visit Lake Street. Heavy Table retains editorial control of the series — as with Central Avenue and the Green Line, this tour will be warts-and-all.

“From the river to the lakes, visitors and residents can shop local and be social on Lake Street. More information at VisitLakeStreet.com.”

WACSO / Heavy Table

Urban Forage Winery and Cider House
3016 E Lake St, Minneapolis

WACSO / Heavy Table

With its long, narrow space, wood floors, and works from local artists hanging on the walls, Urban Forage could easily be mistaken for an independent neighborhood coffee shop. Tables run the length of the room. There’s couch seating by the front door. The knotty, wood-topped bar in the back of the room has a brick wall behind it and reclaimed doors hanging above it, giving it a rustic charm. All in all, this would be a fine space to meet a few friends and chill over some hard cider.

WACSO / Heavy Table

WACSO / Heavy Table

Urban Forage’s name is also its mission. The idea of a cider and fruit wine producer dedicated — at least partially — to gathering ingredients from neighborhood trees and gardens is certainly unique. Now you know whom to call when your apple tree starts bearing fruit and you get sick of eating apple crumble. — M.C.

*** FOOD NOTES ***

WACSO / Heavy Table

When at a new taproom/cocktail room/cidery, ordering a tasting flight is always a strong opening move. For $11 at Urban Forage, we got a flight of ciders including dry, black currant, gin botanical, and semisweet varieties.

Some flights encompass a wide, cleanly defined range of flavors; some are random scatterplots; and some, like the flight at Urban Forage, offer a surprisingly tight grouping of flavors. Urban Forage’s dry cider was in fact quite dry, clean, and restrained, but the semisweet wasn’t much juicier or sweeter — it certainly would pass as dry at many other cideries. The black currant cider had a bold, bright color that suggested a wave of bright, earthy berry flavor, but the product itself was restrained — a bit of funkiness and fruitiness surrounding a fairly neat, clean cider product. Likewise, the gin botanical cider had an opportunity to get a bit nuts with flavors of citrus, juniper, anise (etc., etc.), but it was restrained and focused, with an earthy edge that added interest without going too far astray from the cider base. — James Norton

WACSO / Heavy Table

Amandi Cafe
2927 E Lake St, Minneapolis

The little pink building with ice cream cones on the sign caught our eye as we were walking by on our way to another spot. Given the unseasonably cold weather, ice cream wouldn’t have been our first choice for a stop, but our job is not to question, it is to just go in. This is the checklist, after all.

WACSO / Heavy Table

It turns out the sign was a bit of a misdirect. The cafe actually specializes in rolled ice cream rather than the traditional scoops in a cone depicted on the sign. Here, you get these tightly curled, cigar shaped rolls of ice cream served in the white paper carryout containers you often get at Asian joints.

The space was sparse, with a few tables and a small counter where you can watch the fascinating process of making rolled ice cream. The freehand chalk menu on the wall offered a few special mixes, or you can create your own from a hodgepodge of goodies like Oreos, M&M’s, strawberries, and caramel sauce.

WACSO / Heavy Table

On one of the tables there was a board game handmade using cardboard and a Sharpie. The young man who served us happily showed us how to play. It turned out to be a game called Ludo, which is a form of the Indian game Pachisi, which was appropriated by Parker Brothers and marketed as Parcheesi. But there’s something much more gratifying about using coins as game pieces on a handmade game board. Take that, all you fat cats running the Board Game Industrial Complex. — M.C.

*** FOOD NOTES ***

WACSO / Heavy Table

We’ve tried Thai rolled ice cream only a few times, but we’re starting to get a feel for it. The basic product (the base liquid that freezes on contact with the anti-griddle and is scraped off into chewy curls of ice cream) seems pretty consistent in terms of its quality and properties, but the toppings can vary quite a bit.

WACSO / Heavy Table

We tried a couple of rolled ice creams at Amandi Cafe with varying results. The Coffee Delight ($6) worked as an ice cream (with all the mildly sweet, surprisingly chewy qualities we’ve come to expect from the genre), but the blast of hyper-sweet, one-dimensional caramel sauce that covered it did the dish no favors.

WACSO / Heavy Table

The Cookie Monster ($6) worked much more smoothly. Crumbled bits of Oreo cookies introduced a good textural counterpoint to the dish’s cookies-and-cream ice cream — it was a chewy-meets-crunchy sort of thing, and that works. The chocolate sauce that it was blasted with wasn’t terrific, but neither did it spoil the fun. — J.N.

WACSO / Heavy Table

Town Talk Diner & Gastropub
2707 E Lake St, Minneapolis

Town Talk Diner has one of the most iconic signs in the Twin Cities. It’s the kind of marquee that grabs your attention and predisposes you to liking the place. So any restaurant that occupies this space has big expectations to fill from the jump.

WACSO / Heavy Table

The old side of this place — the part underneath the marquee — is where the original diner used to be. It’s a distinctive space with hints of its past. It’s long and narrow with brick walls, terrazzo floors, and chrome and stainless surfaces. The formerly Formica lunch counter (we’re just guessing here, but come on, it had to be Formica, right?) has been replaced with a long marble bar. Flattop griddles no longer sizzle behind the counter either. Instead there’s an open kitchen at the far end of the room.

WACSO / Heavy Table

The “newer” side of the place — which you get to through an opening in the original foot-and-a-half-thick brick wall — is where you’ll find the main dining room. This side is pleasant enough, with wood bench seating, drop lights, reclaimed wood plank floors and tabletops. But, frankly, we prefer the old side.

Admittedly, we’re probably biased. There’s something we find inherently interesting about an old diner space. You can almost feel the spirits of regulars past haunting the wobbly counter stools, sipping black coffee, reading a quarter-folded copy of the Minneapolis Star, and grumbling about the weather. — M.C.

*** FOOD NOTES ***

We’ve long ago lost track of the exact number and nature of the incarnations of the Town Talk Diner, but we can remember a few: the lively old Tim Niver / Nick Kosevich place, the watered down Theros-owned version that got sunk in part by an embezzlement scandal, and Le Town Talk, the ambitious, French-inflected reboot that never quite found its way.

The current version is an odd candidate for the gentrifying, but still largely working class Longfellow neighborhood —  it’s ambitiously farm-to-table, wide-ranging in its flavors and influences, and assertively priced.

WACSO / Heavy Table

Our Old Fashioned would have been good for $7, but it was priced at $11. The shovel-full of ice chips that filled the glass created instant and overwhelming dilution, mostly swamping the impact of the otherwise well-crafted drink.

WACSO / Heavy Table

The restaurant’s take on savory potato pierogies would send the vast majority of Polish grandmothers into a tirade about kids these days. Twelve dollars gets you four relatively small dumplings floating elegantly on a bed of Napa cabbage slaw with cider gastrique. The ones we sampled were perfectly browned and crispy, but disarmingly sweet and aggressively salty. All things considered, we’d rather pay $8 for eight big, artless-but-soulful old-fashioned versions of this old-school dish.

WACSO / Heavy Table

The flip side of the pierogies was the set of three meatballs on a red “Sunday sauce” which couldn’t have been tastier. They were remarkably rich without being greasy, perfectly crisped yet pleasingly rare at the core, and swimming in a shallow layer of full-flavored, well-composed tomato sauce. $12 is a lot for three meatballs, but these guys were worth the money.

WACSO / Heavy Table

For our entree, we chose the Cioppino ($22). It’s a dish that we really enjoyed at Cafe Biaggio on University Avenue and a legitimate test for a chef. The various shellfish elements were perfectly cooked; getting scallops, shrimp, and mussels all thoroughly cooked but agreeably tender is no small feat. Unfortunately, all that effort was undone by the dish’s sauce, which tasted something like a hyper-concentrated liquid chorizo sausage complete with a palate-scalding dose of salt. Good seafood whispers its quality, and this stuff got thoroughly shouted down by the seasoning that surrounded it. — J.N.

WACSO / Heavy Table

Lake Coffee House
3223 E Lake St, Minneapolis

Lake Coffee House sits at the end of a tiny strip mall buffered from Lake Street by a small parking lot. Inside there are a couple of comfy seating areas with couches and armchairs along with a few tables and chairs. Although some of the books and CDs and art are for sale, don’t be tempted by the stacks of older books covered with knick-knacks and dried flowers, which appear to be for decoration only.

WACSO / Heavy Table

The space is a bit of a throwback to the era 20 years ago when the first independent coffee shops started showing up in neighborhoods. It’s kind of an extension-of-your-living-room vibe. Thus, the name coffee house.

WACSO / Heavy Table

A massive collection of half-filled pump-top bottles of flavored syrup was scattered around the coffee prep area, and the guy behind the counter worked them like some kind of mad scientist out to invent just the right wacky mix of sugary additives to blow the lid off the coffee house industry.  — M.C.

WACSO / Heavy Table

*** FOOD NOTES ***

WACSO / Heavy Table

WACSO / Heavy Table

The philosophy of Lake Coffee House’s specialty drinks isn’t really first-, second-, or third-wave per se; it’s another wave entirely, a wave in which pumped Monin syrups are the flavor drivers to the exclusion of the rest of the coffee experience. We tried a Lavender Blackberry White Mocha Latte ($4.25) and received a blast of lavender flavor so strong that it could have knocked the hooves off a large, healthy horse.

By contrast, our Maple Spice Latte ($4.25) was surprisingly restrained and clean. The coffee flavor was understated, and the foam was pronounced.

WACSO / Heavy Table

We also tried some of the house-made hummus ($4). It lacked the ethereal lightness of the stuff we’ve recently enjoyed at Halwo Kismayo and African Paradise, but it packed a lovely, colossal natural garlic punch. A little went a long way. — J.N.

WACSO / Heavy Table

Himalayan Restaurant
2910 E Lake St, Minneapolis

The poster of a wild-eyed Gene Wilder from Young Frankenstein reminding visitors to buy restaurant gift cards was so random, yet such a perfect segue from our mad scientist at the Lake Coffee house, that it kind of worked. We’re still not quite sure how Young Frankenstein connects to Nepalese, Indian, and Tibetan cuisine, but hey, we’re writing about it so perhaps the promotion worked.

WACSO / Heavy Table

WACSO / Heavy Table

Himalayan Restaurant occupies a stand-alone building with its own parking lot, which was packed on the Friday night we visited. True, you’d expect a vibrant scene at a restaurant on Friday night, but this felt like a regular occurrence.

WACSO / Heavy Table

The restaurant’s appearance, too, hints that it’s consistently busy. The overall design is simple exposed ceilings painted black and walls decorated with art and photography of Tibetan and Nepalese culture.

We stood in the small entry area doing the Wait-List Boogie: that shuffle back and forth to avoid people coming and going, paying their checks, grabbing to-go orders, and leaving with doggy bags. — M.C.

*** FOOD NOTES ***

WACSO / Heavy Table

The Sampler Platter at the Himalayan is only $10.50, but it’s overloaded with options: four fried pyaazi (onion and vegetable fritters), two vegetable momos (tender little Tibetan dumplings), two meat kothe (fried momos), and one large samosa. The momos were excellent, substantial but still delicate in texture, with a pleasantly herbed vegetable filling. The kothe wasn’t bad at all, but we prefer our momos un-fried, as it turned out. We thought the pyaazi were good when dipped into any of the three sauces that accompanied our platter, but the standout dish was the samosa stuffed with spiced potatoes and peas. With its surprisingly delicate exterior and its fragrant and masterfully spiced interior, this was truly a king among its doughy peoples.

WACSO / Heavy Table

Masu (lamb curry, $17) is billed on the menu as boneless lamb pieces swimming in a light tomato sauce, but there’s nothing light about this dish. It’s earthy, comforting, and deeply flavored, akin to a Tibetan-inflected winter stew. Piled atop rice and eaten on a snowy evening, it really can’t be beat.

WACSO / Heavy Table

What makes a great biryani? Trying the Chicken Biryani ($13) at the Himalayan reminded us of the lovely specimen we tasted all the way back at Paradise Biryani Pointe, two checklists and about 200 restaurants ago. The dish: tender but well-defined rice, assertive but balanced depth of spice, a pleasing mix of dainty bits of chicken and dried fruit small enough to float among the grains of rice without calling too much attention to themselves. The Himalayan’s rendition also included a raita (yogurt sauce) with a distinct and pleasingly spiced (and mildly spicy) flavor all its own. Sprinkled on top of the rice, it created something magical. — J.N.



Chef Camp Announces First Chef for 2018: Nettie Colón + Underground Cooking

This story is sponsored by Chef Camp.

At Chef Camp, between campfire cooking classes and summer camp activities, everyone sits down to chef-prepared meals. This year, Nettie Colón will be the Camp Cook serving up those meals. Her creativity, farm-to-table focus, and willingness to dig a fire pit just about anywhere are guaranteed to make the food unforgettable.

Adam Hester

She’ll be combining many different styles of underground cooking — from the Andean pachamanca, a layered meal cooked in a pit for many hours, to the Sardinian carraxu, where whole animals are wrapped in herbs and slowly cooked in a fire. She will incorporate ingredients and flavors that she has picked up from her many travels.

Born in New York City and raised in Puerto Rico, Nettie spent her formative years learning traditional Puerto Rican cooking methods with her grandmother and her friends. Nettie was chef de cuisine for over a decade at Luciaʼs Restaurant & Wine Bar in Uptown, Minneapolis. For seven years Nettie taught Mayan cuisine classes in the Biosphere Reserve of Sian Ka’an in Tulum on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. She currently runs creative pop-up events through her company Red Hen Gastrolab.

Adam Hester

Nettie taught three amazing classes at last year’s Chef Camp and did a surprise octopus demonstration. Get the recipe for her Charred Octopus with Grilled Lemon Coriander Sauce here.

Tickets to Chef Camp are available now!