The Tap Moves to Email, a Reader Survey, and More

Banner for the Tap: Food and Drink News

This week in The Tap: a new format for the Tap, a look ahead at upcoming restaurants in the greater Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area, notes about spots that have closed, and about those that have recently opened.

The Tap will transition in late May to an email newsletter-only format with newly added News and Events sections – SIGN UP HERE

The Tap is the metro area’s comprehensive restaurant buzz roundup, so if you see a new or newly shuttered restaurant, or anything that’s “coming soon,” email Tap editor James Norton at editor@heavytable.com.

The Tap’s Big Move

After seven years as a Web-only feature on the Heavy Table, our Tap column will be moving to an email newsletter format starting next week. Subscribe here if you’d like to continue following Minnesota restaurant openings, closings, and upcoming new spots.

In the new email-only edition of the Tap, we’ll also be adding news and events roundups to the Tap, drawing from the news and press releases that cross our desks and the many events submitted to our calendar section.

Heavy Table’s 2018 Reader Survey

We’re looking for your input on the content you love, the media you use, and the directions you’d like to see Heavy Table take in the future – please visit our 2018 Reader Survey and weigh in with your feedback. It means a lot to us! – James Norton

NOW OPEN:

  • Tori 44, 2203 44th Ave N, Minneapolis | Official grand opening tomorrow night (May 2). A new ramen restaurant and noodle manufacturing facility in the former Victory 44 location from the owners of Tori Ramen.
  • The Hideaway, 219 SE Main St., Minneapolis | “Northwoods burger bar” by Jeff Arundel of Aster Cafe and Jefe.
  • Fish Bowl Poke, Nicollet and 34th, Minneapolis | Soon | A new poke restaurant by Matthew Kazama.
  • The Grand Catch, 1672 Grand Ave, St. Paul | The Wadi brothers and Thien Ly of Cajun Deli have opened a seafood shack on Grand Avenue.
  • Maverick’s, 1746 N. Lexington Ave., Roseville | The reopening of the famed roast beef sandwich spot.
  • Spring Cafe, Como Lake Pavilion (1360 Lexington Parkway, St. Paul) | Hot and cold lunches and dinners and grab-and-go at Lake Como.

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

  • Parlour Bar, 267 W Seventh St, St. Paul | The popular Minneapolis Warehouse District bar-restaurant (pictured above) has opened a branch in St. Paul.
  • The Bungalow Club, 4300 E Lake St, Minneapolis | A neighborhood establishment, in the former Craftsman space, focused on fresh pastas.


Rose Street Patisserie Opening a New Location in St. Paul

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

Chef/owner John Kraus (Patisserie 46, Rose Street Patisserie) is world-acclaimed and the hype isn’t fluff – the baked goods at his shops stand up to bakeries anywhere, France included. Therefore, news that he’ll be opening a new location of Rose Street (pictured above and below) at 171 Snelling Ave. in St. Paul falls firmly under the heading of “awesome.”

A press release for the new location cites a mid-summer opening date, and promises ice cream and sorbet along with the familiar croissants and tartines.

Brenda Johnson / Heavy Table

What: Rose Street Patisserie

When: Opening Midsummer 2018

Where: 171 Snelling Ave. N., St Paul, MN 55104

Summary: Rose Street Patisserie, the sister store to the acclaimed Patisserie 46, will open a new St. Paul location at the corner of Selby and Snelling. Along with Rose Street’s food offerings, the new location will add ice cream and sorbet to the menu.

 St. Paul, MN— April 30, 2018

Beloved Bakers Rose Street Patisserie to Open St. Paul Location

Great news for St. Paul fans of patisserie: Rose Street Patisserie, the sister store to the acclaimed Patisserie 46, will open a new St. Paul location this summer. The new location at the corner of Selby and Snelling will bring offerings that are “authentically French minus the airfare” to an already thriving retail hub. 

 The menu will include savory options such as tartines, ham-and-cheese baguette, quiche, and grain salad, as well as viennoiserie (breakfast pastries) including pain au chocolat, almond croissant, ham-and-cheese croissant, seasonal danish, gibassier, kouign-amann, scones and more. To top things off, the new location will also have an assortment of ice cream and sorbet offerings — mango-cilantro, salted caramel, vanilla, chocolate, and raspberry-rose, to name a few.

St. Paulites have been loyal regulars at both Patisserie 46 and Rose Street and have actively asked for a location that’s closer to home. “As a bakery we constantly search for new neighborhoods where we can put down our roots. We have found that neighborhood in St. Paul, and we’re sure it will be a great addition to our family. We look forward to sharing many stories and laughs with our new neighbors,” said Elizabeth Rose, CEO.

The new location, which formerly housed a Starbucks, is 1,300 square feet and will be undergoing a refresh courtesy of Shea architects. The space should be ready to open mid-summer and will have seating for 25 as well as great take-away options. Patio seating is in the works as well.

Chef/owner John Kraus, the first American to be inducted into Relais Desserts, a 100-member organization consisting of the best of the best pastry chefs, is thrilled to be crossing the river: “It’s the beginning of a beautiful relationship. We’ve got more exciting plans coming soon. This year is all about bringing our best to loyal fans and introducing ourselves and our offerings to new audiences. St. Paul, we’re looking forward to spending time with you!”



Heavy Table Hot Five: April 27-May 3

hotfive-flames

Each Friday, this list will track five of the best things Heavy Table’s writers, editors, and photographers have recently bitten or sipped. Have a suggestion for the Hot Five? Email editor@heavytable.com.

shepherd-song-banner-ad-horiz-3The Hot Five is a weekly feature created by the Heavy Table and supported by Shepherd Song Farm.

shepherd-song-green-keyline

Amy Rea / Heavy Table

1-new - one - hot fiveOne Love Bowl at Pimento Jamaican Kitchen
Pimento Jamaican Kitchen’s One Love bowl is just so satisfying. You get your choice of entrees, and I went with jerk chicken and jerk pork and honestly couldn’t tell which I liked best. The strong, peppery jerk is so tasty, the meats are impossibly tender, and the lightly dressed citrus slaw is the perfect foil. This one’s a keeper.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by Amy Rea]

James Norton / Heavy Table

2-new - two - hot fiveBlue Blood by Indeed Brewing
We’ve been fans of the Wooden Soul series of cask-aged sours at Indeed Brewing from the get-go, and Blue Blood is another fine example of the lineage — yeasty, not too carbonated, and cherry-inflected (almost winey) without too much acidic bite or edge. Pretty beautiful stuff.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]

James Norton / Heavy Table

3-new - three hot fiveSmorgasbord Plate at The Bungalow Club
We’ve been looking forward to the Craftsman’s successor — a classy but accessible Italian-inspired place called The Bungalow Club — ever since we heard about it a few months ago. It was well worth the wait. The crown jewel of our first visit was a Smorgasbord Plate that did justice to the tremendous charcuterie plates Craftsman chef Mike Phillips used to put out back in the day. The pate was light and airy, the deviled egg spread devilishly delicious (and equally light on the palate), and the pickled veg all profound without being acrid or aggressive.
[Last Week on the Hot Five: #1 | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]

James Norton / Heavy Table

4-new four hot fiveClarity of Purpose by Fair State and Surly
The result of a Surly/Fair State collaboration, Clarity of Purpose is an effort to create a New England-style IPA with the style’s full body, strong hop aroma, juicy flavor, and mild bitterness, but without any of the haze that drinkers typically see in this sort of beer. Mission accomplished: Although this isn’t as juicy and intense as the style can be, it’s mellow, tropical-fruity, juicy, and hop-kissed without being hazy or in any way astringent.
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted by James Norton]

James Norton / Heavy Table

5-new -fiveCalifornia Steakburger at Freddy’s Frozen Custard
The Wichita-based and rapidly expanding Freddy’s franchise is creeping into Minnesota suburbs, so we decided to give it a shot. Although the frozen custard doesn’t measure up to anything out of Wisconsin, the Steakburgers are great, if they’re your style of choice: They’re smashed/thin/charred/steaky-tasting burgers with a lot of texture and flavor. They’re actually so thin that a double is the way to go if you want a full meal (as opposed to the double at Five Guys, which’ll kill ya).
[Debuting on the Hot Five | Submitted from an Instagram post by James Norton]



Snacking in the Bike Lane: Tacos and Cemitas on East Lake Street

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

This is the second in a four-part series of stories underwritten by Sociable Cider Werks that trace a 22-mile bike route through Minneapolis and St. Paul, hitting markets and off-the-grid eateries along the way.

Ask me what my favorite eating “neighborhood” is, and I will one hundred percent tell you that it’s Lake Street.

While Uptown continually loses street cred due to ongoing gentrification (RIP big, beautiful, old, neon Arby’s sign), any number of hidden-in-plain-sight Uptown gems are on Lake; these include Darbar Indian and even the new Hasty Tasty, which happens to have the best mac and cheese in the city.

But cross over into East Lake, and the thoroughfare takes you on an eating tour of the world.

Whether you seek the best fried catfish, the best burrito, the best Ecuadoran, the best Nepalese, or at least a dozen more international “bests,” Lake has it. Rarely can riding in a straight line get you so many places in a single hour. Bust out that cycle, pedal it forward, and see what I mean.

This series is underwritten by Sociable Cider Werks, makers of innovative libations that are best shared with a friend.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Que Chula es Puebla, 1116 E Lake St, Minneapolis

I don’t know any more-intrepid food slingers in the Twin Cities than the taco trucks of East Lake Street, many of which operate in the most frigid of weather. If the generators keep up, tacos shall spill forth from windows.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

A couple of years ago, a big green beauty appeared among the usual suspects and started serving some astonishing creations to match its aesthetic flash. As the name Que Chula es Puebla suggests, they’re cooking up some specialties from the Puebla region of Mexico, and you won’t want to miss the Cemita. It’s a beast of a sandwich, in which some of the bread is removed from the roll, and in that formerly flavorless space you will find avocado, Oaxaca cheese, crema, and chipotle sauce. The meat (beef, chicken, or pork) is breaded and deep fried and hangs almost obscenely off the bun. This is a sandwich to end all sandwiches.

Or go for the Tacos Arabe, served in a pita instead of a tortilla: an entire meal priced at $3. Que Chula es Puebla is neck-and-neck with El Primo (usually parked in the K-Mart parking lot) for the top taco in town. The hot sauces alone are worth the trip.

Not into Mexican? They got burgers and fries, dude.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Super Mercado Morelia, 1417 E Lake St, Minneapolis

Even the most dedicated East Lake Street Mexican food buff may not have made it to Super Mercado Morelia, and that’s a shame. It looks like nothing from the outside (or from the inside, come to think of it), but when nothing but home cooking will do, this is your place.

Walk to the back of the simple supermarket, where a woman will be running a buffet. Don’t ask for a menu — there ain’t one. The lady is your menu, and she’ll take you on a tour of the day’s offerings by opening the steam table wells and showing you around. If you’re not a Spanish speaker, choose with your eyes and your nose.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

I picked what could only be described as stewed chicken in fire sauce, and it was probably my favorite dish of this East Lake tour. It’s mind-numbingly hot, but also as nuanced as your grandma’s finest chicken stew, and served simply with beans and rice. Your choice of bread or tortillas (I don’t have to tell you which to choose, right?) finishes things. This is a day-maker in a bag for a few bucks. Head here when your heart, head, or soul is aching. They’ll set you straight.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

La Alborada, 1855 E Lake St, Minneapolis

As the trendy food world goes gaga for food halls, the best kept secret is that East Lake Street’s Mexican community has been doing them for decades. Look around and you’ll find a smattering of these markets where everything from a pair of boots to a tortilla press to a pastry can be yours inside of five minutes.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

An all-time fave is La Alborada, which contains everything a grocery store should, but holds also a bakery, a carniceria (a butcher counter, where all the meats required to make your tacos better at home can be had), and one of the better selections of dried chilies in the city. Lots more of course (tres leches cakes, flan, those chili-flavored potato chips you got addicted to in Mexico), but the real siren song is the lunch counter. On a recent visit we had Oaxacan tamales, my preferred type, as the banana leaf wrappers keep the masa more moist than do the more-commonly used corn-husks. Filled with mole, they’re an extra special find not available just anywhere.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Hey vegetarians, heads up: There are taco selections at La Alborada that are going to blow your mind. Start with handmade tortillas filled with rice, onion, and chilies; then choose either hard boiled egg, poblano pepper filled with cheese, or my pick of the moment, potato cake, a crisp-on-the-outside, lush-as-mashed-potatoes-on-the-inside dish unto itself. But tucked into the tortilla, it’s nothing short of a taco sensation.

There’s also a taco packed with veggies like zucchini, corn, and bell pepper, so if you’re always looking on forlornly while your buddies scarf cabeza and al pastor, this place is for you.

DIRECTIONS FOR THIS LEG, FROM SENTYRZ TO LA ALBORADA

SENTYRZ LIQUOR AND SUPERMARKET (see previous installment) 1612 NE 2nd St to QUE CHULA ES PUEBLA [6 miles]

Head south on NE Second St toward 16th Ave NE .6 miles
Turn right onto 8th Ave NE .6 miles
Continue onto Plymouth Ave N
Turn left onto W River Pkwy 1.7 mi
Turn right onto 11th Ave S 0.3 mi
Turn left onto Hiawatha Bike Trail 1.6 mi
Turn right onto Midtown Greenway 0.8 mi
Turn left onto 13th Ave S 0.1 mi
Turn right onto E Lake St, Destination on the right

QUE CHULA ES PUEBLA 1116 E Lake St. to Super Mercado Morelia [.2 miles]
Head east on East Lake St three blocks

SUPER MERCADO MORELIA 1417 E Lake St to La Alborada [.5 miles]
Head east on E Lake St for four blocks

LA ALBORADA 1855 E Lake St

PREVIOUS LEG: The Markets of Northeast Minneapolis
THIS LEG: Tacos and Cemitas on East Lake Street
NEXT LEG: From East Lake Street to University Avenue



Dual Citizen Brewing in Midway

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Joining the ranks of University Avenue breweries is the aptly named Dual Citizen Brewing Co. Named for its position on the border between Minneapolis and St. Paul, Dual Citizen opened its taproom in late January. Its production is focused on classic beer styles rather than trends.

Co-owner and head brewer Max Filter worked for Colorado’s Left Hand Brewing Company after attending the brewing program at the Siebel Institute. General manager Tim Kessler also studied at Siebel, and the two (who are cousins) have a long history of home brewing together. Dual Citizen has been a long time coming. It follows a 2010 brewing venture by the cousins that didn’t pan out.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

The taproom is a beautiful, inviting space with high ceilings. Two walls with oversized windows allow for natural light, while the design is kept minimalist. The service was fair. The two bartenders during our visit were neither friendly nor uninterested. Prices were in line with other taprooms with 4-ounce samples for $2, pints for $6, and 10-ounce pours for $4.50 for nearly all the beers.

We tried the Lyndale Session Pale Ale for a lower-alcohol introduction to the brewery’s lineup. The aroma was mildly vegetal, an odor attributable to hops. Unfortunately, the flavor didn’t overcome the odd aroma, and the muddy taste contained some minerality and a vague butter note, possibly a byproduct of fermentation problems. The glass was dominated by bitterness and there was little discernible hop-derived flavor from the additions of Galena and Chinook hops.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

Also among the menu’s easy-drinking beers was the Kellogg Cream Ale, which was similarly disappointing. An overly bitter flavor masked some of the issues in the aroma, including sulfur and rubber. On warming, this beer displayed fermentation struggles like imitation butter, a hallmark beer flaw.

From the darker beers, opt for the Grand Imperial Stout. Despite an eyebrow-raising lavender note on the nose, the depth of malt character ranged from toasted bread to burnt marshmallow. The finish was quite bitter, even for the style, but it didn’t take away from the malt flavor. With a little more body to elevate this from a colalike mouthfeel, Grand would be a notable success. But other dark choices fell short, from a coffee brown that’s all coffee to the peated dry stout with a chemical smoke flavor.

Brianna Stachowski / Heavy Table

The clear winner of the taproom selections was the Spring Pale Ale. Though the aroma was faint, the balance of caramel malt and bright, fruit-forward hop flavor was pleasant. Over time, intense bitterness builds, but the herbaceous quality with notes of orange peel makes this beer the best of the bunch.

Dual Citizen will no doubt attract a crowd in the evolving Midway area thanks to amenities like the Green Line and attractions like Can Can Wonderland. Unfortunately, the first impression may be a miss for many visitors. The location and space may bring people back for a second try, and one can hope that the beers improve in the meantime.

Dual Citizen Brewing Co., 725 Raymond Ave, St. Paul, MN 55114; 651.330.4750. Tue-Thu 3 p.m.-10 p.m., Fri 3 p.m.-midnight, Sat noon-midnight, Sun noon-8 p.m.